The Scientific Retribution (I did my part) … Part One

Summer is slow, even when I am writing my thesis, and I decided to get the apache logs from the web server that is hosting my website (aka gaijin) and see how many people have downloaded my publications so far. I discovered the logs for 1 year back and voila … the results:

Starting Date: Tue Aug 04 05:21:07 EEST 2009
Ending Date: Mon Aug 23 22:52:25 EEST 2010

  1. Evaluating the Quality of Open Source Software, 578 hits, (Journal)
  2. Compiling regular expressions into Java bytecodes, 376 hits, (MSc thesis)
  3. Python tutorial (Part IV) – Simple GUI construction with wxPython, 358 hits, (Magazine)
  4. Building an e-business platform: An experience report, 328 hits, (Conference)
  5. Python tutorial (Part I) – Introduction, 305 hits, (Magazine)
  6. FIRE/J: Optimizing regular expression searches with generative programming, 278 hits, (Journal)
  7. Applying MDA in enterprise application interoperability: The PRAXIS project, 260 hits, (Conference)
  8. Enabling B2B transactions over the internet through application interconnection: The PRAXIS project, 239 hits, (Conference)
  9. Python tutorial (Part III) – Handling Bibliography with Python, 224 hits, (Magazine)
  10. PEGASUS: Competitive load balancing using inetd, 181 hits, (Conference)
  11. A Software Development Metaphor for Developing Semi-dynamic Web Sites through Declarative Specifications, 171 hits, (Technical Report)
  12. Software Quality Assessment of Open Source Software, 156 hits, (Conference)
  13. Python tutorial (Part II) – Blogging with Python, 153 hits, (Magazine)
  14. Performing peer-to-peer e-business transactions: A requirements analysis and preliminary design proposal, 151 hits, (Conference)
  15. Introducing Pergamos: A Fedora-based DL System Utilizing Digital Object Prototypes, 142 hits, (Conference)
  16. Tuning java’s memory manager for high performance server applications, 141 hits, (Conference)
  17. Enabling B2B transactions over the Internet through Application Interconnection: The PRAXIS Project., 130 hits, (Poster, Conference)
  18. Fortifying applications against XPath injection attacks, 60 hits, (Conference)
  19. J%: Integrating Domain-Specific Languages with Java, 46 hits, (Conference)
  20. Blueprints for a Large-Scale Early Warning System, 38 hits, (Conference)

In addition, I used a Geolocation database for the IP Addresses and listed hits from specific countries:

  1. United States 2299
  2. Greece 1036
  3. Russian Federation 196
  4. China 121
  5. Czech Republic 77
  6. India 63
  7. United Kingdom 53
  8. Netherlands 52
  9. Germany 44
  10. Brazil 34
  11. Thailand 32
  12. Taiwan 31
  13. Korea, Republic of 26
  14. Japan 17
  15. Egypt 15
  16. South Africa 14
  17. Cyprus 11
  18. Spain 10
  19. Ukraine 8
  20. Canada 7
  21. Italy 6
  22. Turkey 5
  23. Sri Lanka 4
  24. Indonesia 3
  25. United Arab Emirates 2
  26. Belarus 1

Total number of downloads was 4872.

My Favorite 2008 Quote

In this publication, Dr. Schlangemann indicates that:

“In this work we better understand how digital-to-analog converters can be applied to the development of e-commerce.”

I really wonder how this paper got accepted. The peer-review process is so problematic? Or maybe the conferences are so many, that scientists are literally bombed with paper reviews?